thisistheverge:

Michel Gondry talks technology, his latest film ‘Mood Indigo, and why he can’t use an iPhone
You wouldn’t notice Michel Gondry unless you were looking for him. The 51-year-old French director of such fantastical, visually mesmerizing movies as Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, The Science of Sleep and Be Kind Rewind is thin, cool, and reserved, though his boyish blue eyes contain a mischievous glimmer. When he speaks about the subjects that impassion him — including his latest film, Mood Indigo, which premiered in the US in limited release this past weekend — he exudes infectious energy.

thisistheverge:

Michel Gondry talks technology, his latest film ‘Mood Indigo, and why he can’t use an iPhone
You wouldn’t notice Michel Gondry unless you were looking for him. The 51-year-old French director of such fantastical, visually mesmerizing movies as Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, The Science of Sleep and Be Kind Rewind is thin, cool, and reserved, though his boyish blue eyes contain a mischievous glimmer. When he speaks about the subjects that impassion him — including his latest film, Mood Indigo, which premiered in the US in limited release this past weekend — he exudes infectious energy.

“And how hard is it to land even a minimum-wage job? This year, the Ivy League college admissions acceptance rate was 8.9%. Last year, when Walmart opened its first store in Washington, D.C., there were more than 23,000 applications for 600 jobs, which resulted in an acceptance rate of 2.6%, making the big box store about twice as selective as Harvard and five times as choosy as Cornell. Telling unemployed people to get off their couches (or out of the cars they live in or the shelters where they sleep) and get a job makes as much sense as telling them to go study at Harvard.”

npr:

katiecouric:

Design can be a great tool for self-expression. Check out the history of interior design. (via Fast Company)

If you’ve got a few minutes of downtime, try playing with this awesome interactive infographic!

– Alexander

zerostatereflex:

How Ink is Made

(I left out a couple parts for clarity, where towards the end they add wax and fillers, though please watch the video. It’s beautifully shot and goes into more detail,..)

(plus it has epic orchestral music in the background which makes any learning experience more badass).

thisistheverge:

From Alzheimer’s to ADHD: what doctors can diagnose from your voice alone
If Guillermo Cecchi wants to figure out if you’ve taken MDMA or meth, all he needs is a computer and a recording of your voice. Cecchi is a computer scientist at IBM, and part of a growing community of scientists who think our voices can reveal far more than our sex, age, or cultural origins. He thinks it can also unlock the mind — and the various psychological and neurological states our brains may be experiencing at any given time. “This is exactly what psychiatrists do every day: they talk to the patients,” Cecchi says, “but we used machine learning and mathematics to replicate it.”

thisistheverge:

From Alzheimer’s to ADHD: what doctors can diagnose from your voice alone
If Guillermo Cecchi wants to figure out if you’ve taken MDMA or meth, all he needs is a computer and a recording of your voice. Cecchi is a computer scientist at IBM, and part of a growing community of scientists who think our voices can reveal far more than our sex, age, or cultural origins. He thinks it can also unlock the mind — and the various psychological and neurological states our brains may be experiencing at any given time. “This is exactly what psychiatrists do every day: they talk to the patients,” Cecchi says, “but we used machine learning and mathematics to replicate it.”

micdotcom:

Dramatic photos capture the rapid decline of a single Detroit block

It’s a heartbreaking story told in just six pictures.

After a fire destroyed nine houses on one block of Garland Street in Detroit, the Detroit News looked back to tell the block’s story. While their reporting went back nearly a century, the images only need to go back seven years to make an impact.

The dangerous epidemic sweeping Detroit

molecularbiologistproblems:

currentsinbiology:

Young Scientists Say They’re Sexually Abused In The Field (NPR)

In a survey of scientists engaged in field research, the majority — 64 percent — said they had personally experienced sexual harassment while at a field site, and 22 percent reported being the victim of sexual assault.
Most of the people reporting harassment or assault were women, and the vast majority were still students or postdocs.
And for female victims, the perpetrator was more likely to be a superior, not a peer. “This is happening to them when they are trainees, when they are most vulnerable within the academic hierarchy,” says evolutionary biologist Katie Hinde , an author on the study in PLOS ONE. Hinde and her colleagues say this could be a factor in the large number of women who enter scientific fields but don’t continue.

Students work at an archaeological dig near Silchester, England.

This makes me sad.

molecularbiologistproblems:

currentsinbiology:

Young Scientists Say They’re Sexually Abused In The Field (NPR)

In a survey of scientists engaged in field research, the majority — 64 percent — said they had personally experienced sexual harassment while at a field site, and 22 percent reported being the victim of sexual assault.

Most of the people reporting harassment or assault were women, and the vast majority were still students or postdocs.

And for female victims, the perpetrator was more likely to be a superior, not a peer. “This is happening to them when they are trainees, when they are most vulnerable within the academic hierarchy,” says evolutionary biologist Katie Hinde , an author on the study in PLOS ONE. Hinde and her colleagues say this could be a factor in the large number of women who enter scientific fields but don’t continue.

Students work at an archaeological dig near Silchester, England.

This makes me sad.

“I love kissing. If I could kiss all day, I would. I can’t stop thinking about kissing. I like kissing more than sex because there’s no end to it. You can kiss forever. You can kiss yourself into oblivion. You can kiss all over the body. You can kiss yourself to sleep. And when you wake up, you can’t stop thinking about kissing. Dammit, I can’t get anything done because I’m so busy thinking about kissing. Kissing is madness! But it’s absolute paradise, if you can find a good kisser.”
Sufjan Stevens on kissing (via orangieporangiepuddingpie)

thinksquad:

Secret city design tricks manipulate your behaviour

http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20131202-dirty-tricks-of-city-design

When Selena Savic walks down a city street, she sees it differently to most people. Whereas other designers might admire the architecture, Savic sees a host of hidden tricks intended to manipulate our behaviour and choices without us realising – from benches that are deliberately uncomfortable to sculptures that keep certain citizens away.

Modern cities are rife with these “unpleasant designs”, says Savic, a PhD student at the Ecole Polytechnique Federerale de Lausanne in Switzerland, who co-authored a book on the subject this year. Once you know these secret tricks are there, it will transform how you see your surroundings. “We call this a silent agent,” says Savic. “These designs are hidden, or not apparent to people they don’t target.” Are you aware of how your city is manipulating you?

In 1999, the UK opened a Design Against Crime research centre, and authorities in Australia and the US have since followed suit. Many of the interventions these groups pioneered are familiar today: such as boundary marks painted around cashpoints to instil an implied privacy zone and prevent “shoulder surfing”.

San Francisco, the birthplace of street skateboarding, was also the first city to design solutions such as “pig’s ears” – metal flanges added to the corner edges of pavements and low walls to deter skateboarders. These periodic bumps along the edge create a barrier that would send a skateboarder tumbling if they tried to jump and slide along.

Indeed, one of the main criticisms of such design is that it aims to exclude already marginalised populations such as youths or the homeless. Unpleasant design, Savic says, “is there to make things pleasant, but for a very particular audience. So in the general case, it’s pleasant for families, but not pleasant for junkies.”

Preventing rough sleeping is a recurring theme. Any space that someone might lie down in, or even sit too long, is likely to see spikes, railings, stones or bollards added. In the Canadian city of Calgary, authorities covered the ground beneath the Louise Bridge with thousands of bowling ball-sized rocks. This unusual landscaping feature wasn’t for the aesthetic benefit of pedestrians walking along the nearby path, but part of a plan to displace the homeless population that took shelter under the bridge.

So next time you’re walking down the street, take a closer look at that bench or bus shelter. It may be trying to change the way you behave.

gjmueller:

Making School Choice Work

School choice is increasingly the new normal in urban education. But in cities with multiple public school options, how can civic leaders create a choice system that works for all families, whether they choose a charter or district public school?
 To answer this question, CRPE researchers surveyed 4,000 parents in eight cities (Baltimore, Cleveland, Denver, Detroit, Indianapolis, New Orleans, Philadelphia, and Washington, D.C.) with high degrees of school choice.

gjmueller:

Making School Choice Work

School choice is increasingly the new normal in urban education. But in cities with multiple public school options, how can civic leaders create a choice system that works for all families, whether they choose a charter or district public school?

To answer this question, CRPE researchers surveyed 4,000 parents in eight cities (Baltimore, Cleveland, Denver, Detroit, Indianapolis, New Orleans, Philadelphia, and Washington, D.C.) with high degrees of school choice.

Taco Bell’s Greatest Marketing Ploy

priceonomics:

On April 1, 1996, Taco Bell “bought” the Liberty Bell, shocking a nation.

Read the Blog Post Here »

salmosalar:

pierregrassou:

collection of robots trying their best

Chelsea, I haven’t laughed at anything so hard in a while, thank you so much. (Especially ketchup bot, who I think might be the Toby version of me.)

Freaky though

floozys:

floozys:

my feminist goal is not to convince men that girls are of value, my feminist goal is to achieve a future where the judgement of our value isn’t in the hands of men. 

and this goes for, especially goes for, trans girls, girls of colour, disabled girls and LGBTQA+ girls. 

girls, all girls, and if you believe otherwise don’t reblog this.   

(Source: floozys)

pewinternet:

Many library staff members say they see the role of a public library enabling access to information, regardless of format. 
Our data shows that 91% of Americans have either used a public library at some point in their life, or say someone else in their household uses a public library. Among them, 77% of Americans who use the internet but lack home access say computer and internet access at their public library is important to them and their family.
An article in the New York Times yesterday explored some of the ways patrons of the Clason’s Point Library branch in the Bronx rely on the library’s internet access—even when the library itself is closed.
Read more

pewinternet:

Many library staff members say they see the role of a public library enabling access to information, regardless of format. 

Our data shows that 91% of Americans have either used a public library at some point in their life, or say someone else in their household uses a public library. Among them, 77% of Americans who use the internet but lack home access say computer and internet access at their public library is important to them and their family.

An article in the New York Times yesterday explored some of the ways patrons of the Clason’s Point Library branch in the Bronx rely on the library’s internet access—even when the library itself is closed.

Read more