thinkmexican:

Paloma Noyola: The Face of Mexico’s Unleashed Potential
When a report emerged in September 2012 that a girl from one of Matamoros’ poorest neighborhoods had attained the highest math score in Mexico, some doubted its veracity. It must be fake, they said.
But it wasn’t fake. Her name is Paloma Noyola, and what most reports failed to mention is that almost all of her classmates also scored very high on the national math test. 10 scored in the 99.99% percentile.
Paloma and her classmates also scored in the top percentile in language. Something special was happening at José Urbina López primary school in Matamoros, and Wired went to take a look.
The high test scores turned out to be the work of a young teacher who also came from humble beginnings. Sergio Juárez Correa was tired of the monotony of teaching out of a book and wanted to try something new to help engage his students when he came across the work of Sugata Mitra, a UK university professor who had innovated a new pedagogy he called SOLE, or self organized learning environments. The new approach paid off.
Although SOLE usually relies on unfettered Internet access for research, Juárez and his students had very limited access. Somehow, he still found a way to apply Mitra’s teachings and unleash their potential.
From the beginning, Paloma’s exceptional abilities were evident:

One day Juárez Correa went to his whiteboard and wrote “1 = 1.00.” Normally, at this point, he would start explaining the concept of fractions and decimals. Instead he just wrote “½ = ?” and “¼ = ?”
“Think about that for a second,” he said, and walked out of the room.
While the kids murmured, Juárez went to the school cafeteria, where children could buy breakfast and lunch for small change. He borrowed about 10 pesos in coins, worth about 75 cents, and walked back to his classroom, where he distributed a peso’s worth of coins to each table. He noticed that Paloma had already written .50 and .25 on a piece of paper.

As Mr. Juárez implemented more of Mitra’s teachings in his classroom, Paloma continued to stand out as an exceptionally gifted student:

Juárez Correa was impressed. But he was even more intrigued by Paloma. During these experiments, he noticed that she almost always came up with the answer immediately. Sometimes she explained things to her tablemates, other times she kept the answer to herself. Nobody had told him that she had an unusual gift. Yet even when he gave the class difficult questions, she quickly jotted down the answers. To test her limits, he challenged the class with a problem he was sure would stump her. He told the story of Carl Friedrich Gauss, the famous German mathematician, who was born in 1777.
When Gauss was a schoolboy, one of his teachers asked the class to add up every number between 1 and 100. It was supposed to take an hour, but Gauss had the answer almost instantly.
“Does anyone know how he did this?” Juárez Correa asked.
A few students started trying to add up the numbers and soon realized it would take a long time. Paloma, working with her group, carefully wrote out a few sequences and looked at them for a moment. Then she raised her hand.
“The answer is 5,050,” she said. “There are 50 pairs of 101.”
Juárez Correa felt a chill. He’d never encountered a student with so much innate ability. He squatted next to her and asked why she hadn’t expressed much interest in math in the past, since she was clearly good at it.
“Because no one made it this interesting,” she said.

Although this Wired piece focuses mostly on Sugata Mitra, it does once again highlight the story of Paloma Noyola. Unfortunately, after a brief spurt of media attention, little on Paloma was ever mentioned and, as was pointed out by Wired, nothing was ever said of Mr. Juárez.
As with most stories in the Mexican press — and those popular with the middle-class — things suddenly become very important once it’s featured in a gringo publication. Which is a very sad commentary. We hope, however, that this story pushes those in the press, state and federal government to look not to the United States for validation but to Mexicans like Sergio Juárez doing good work in places like Matamoros.
The clear message in this story is that there are thousands of Paloma Noyolas going to school in Mexico who, just like her at one time, are not being challenged and therefore aren’t very interested in school. This story can, if we want it to, raise enough awareness to shift the discussion from poverty to opportunity.
Paloma truly personifies both Mexico’s challenges and unleashed potential.
Read the entire Wired story here: How a Radical New Teaching Method Could Unleash a Generation of Geniuses
Editor’s note: As an addendum, Wired provided information on helping support Sugata Mitra and his School in the Clouds project, and although they donated school supplies and equipment to José Urbina López School, we’re interested in seeing if we can help set up a similar fund for Sergio Juárez, the teacher featured in this story.
Also, $9,300 was raised to help fund Paloma’s education last year. We’re going to follow up with the economist who led the fundraising campaign to see how she’s doing. Stay tuned for the updates.
Stay Connected: Twitter | Facebook

thinkmexican:

Paloma Noyola: The Face of Mexico’s Unleashed Potential

When a report emerged in September 2012 that a girl from one of Matamoros’ poorest neighborhoods had attained the highest math score in Mexico, some doubted its veracity. It must be fake, they said.

But it wasn’t fake. Her name is Paloma Noyola, and what most reports failed to mention is that almost all of her classmates also scored very high on the national math test. 10 scored in the 99.99% percentile.

Paloma and her classmates also scored in the top percentile in language. Something special was happening at José Urbina López primary school in Matamoros, and Wired went to take a look.

The high test scores turned out to be the work of a young teacher who also came from humble beginnings. Sergio Juárez Correa was tired of the monotony of teaching out of a book and wanted to try something new to help engage his students when he came across the work of Sugata Mitra, a UK university professor who had innovated a new pedagogy he called SOLE, or self organized learning environments. The new approach paid off.

Although SOLE usually relies on unfettered Internet access for research, Juárez and his students had very limited access. Somehow, he still found a way to apply Mitra’s teachings and unleash their potential.

From the beginning, Paloma’s exceptional abilities were evident:

One day Juárez Correa went to his whiteboard and wrote “1 = 1.00.” Normally, at this point, he would start explaining the concept of fractions and decimals. Instead he just wrote “½ = ?” and “¼ = ?”

“Think about that for a second,” he said, and walked out of the room.

While the kids murmured, Juárez went to the school cafeteria, where children could buy breakfast and lunch for small change. He borrowed about 10 pesos in coins, worth about 75 cents, and walked back to his classroom, where he distributed a peso’s worth of coins to each table. He noticed that Paloma had already written .50 and .25 on a piece of paper.

As Mr. Juárez implemented more of Mitra’s teachings in his classroom, Paloma continued to stand out as an exceptionally gifted student:

Juárez Correa was impressed. But he was even more intrigued by Paloma. During these experiments, he noticed that she almost always came up with the answer immediately. Sometimes she explained things to her tablemates, other times she kept the answer to herself. Nobody had told him that she had an unusual gift. Yet even when he gave the class difficult questions, she quickly jotted down the answers. To test her limits, he challenged the class with a problem he was sure would stump her. He told the story of Carl Friedrich Gauss, the famous German mathematician, who was born in 1777.

When Gauss was a schoolboy, one of his teachers asked the class to add up every number between 1 and 100. It was supposed to take an hour, but Gauss had the answer almost instantly.

“Does anyone know how he did this?” Juárez Correa asked.

A few students started trying to add up the numbers and soon realized it would take a long time. Paloma, working with her group, carefully wrote out a few sequences and looked at them for a moment. Then she raised her hand.

“The answer is 5,050,” she said. “There are 50 pairs of 101.”

Juárez Correa felt a chill. He’d never encountered a student with so much innate ability. He squatted next to her and asked why she hadn’t expressed much interest in math in the past, since she was clearly good at it.

“Because no one made it this interesting,” she said.

Although this Wired piece focuses mostly on Sugata Mitra, it does once again highlight the story of Paloma Noyola. Unfortunately, after a brief spurt of media attention, little on Paloma was ever mentioned and, as was pointed out by Wired, nothing was ever said of Mr. Juárez.

As with most stories in the Mexican press — and those popular with the middle-class — things suddenly become very important once it’s featured in a gringo publication. Which is a very sad commentary. We hope, however, that this story pushes those in the press, state and federal government to look not to the United States for validation but to Mexicans like Sergio Juárez doing good work in places like Matamoros.

The clear message in this story is that there are thousands of Paloma Noyolas going to school in Mexico who, just like her at one time, are not being challenged and therefore aren’t very interested in school. This story can, if we want it to, raise enough awareness to shift the discussion from poverty to opportunity.

Paloma truly personifies both Mexico’s challenges and unleashed potential.

Read the entire Wired story here: How a Radical New Teaching Method Could Unleash a Generation of Geniuses

Editor’s note: As an addendum, Wired provided information on helping support Sugata Mitra and his School in the Clouds project, and although they donated school supplies and equipment to José Urbina López School, we’re interested in seeing if we can help set up a similar fund for Sergio Juárez, the teacher featured in this story.

Also, $9,300 was raised to help fund Paloma’s education last year. We’re going to follow up with the economist who led the fundraising campaign to see how she’s doing. Stay tuned for the updates.

Stay Connected: Twitter | Facebook

“Muddy water is best cleared by leaving it alone.”
 Alan Wilson Watts (via purplebuddhaproject)

huffingtonpost:

WHY THIS WOMAN WOULD RATHER READ HARRY POTTER EROTICA THAN WATCH PORN

When spoken word artist Brenna Twohy tells you that she is an unabashed devotee of all things “Potterotica” — erotic fiction based in the magical universe of Harry Potter — your response probably shouldn’t be that her taste is “unrealistic.” 

Watch her full monologue here. 

(Source: National Poetry Slam uploaded by Button Poetry)

gjmueller:

MIT Offering Free MOOCs on Game Design and Educational Technology

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) has announced a new initiative to teach video game design and online education free of charge. Russell Westerholm of University Herald writes that MIT is kicking off the first series of massive open online courses (MOOCs) this week, focusing on educational technology. Next will come game design starting on Oct. 22, and, in the near future, there will be courses on educational gaming and technology.

image via flickr:CC | Nietnagel

gjmueller:

MIT Offering Free MOOCs on Game Design and Educational Technology

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) has announced a new initiative to teach video game design and online education free of charge. Russell Westerholm of University Herald writes that MIT is kicking off the first series of massive open online courses (MOOCs) this week, focusing on educational technology. Next will come game design starting on Oct. 22, and, in the near future, there will be courses on educational gaming and technology.

image via flickr:CC | Nietnagel

“I refuse to go back to not liking who I was.”
Childish Gambino (via emsfitjourney)

(Source: jvppiter)

newyorker:

Sarah Larson talks with the creators of “Serial,” a spinoff of “This American Life” that is currently exploring a conviction with minimal evidence that put a teen-ager in prison for life: 

“Koenig wants to find the truth, whatever it is, more for human reasons than for legal ones. The team started producing “Serial” without knowing how it would end; in fact, they still don’t know. … They’ve figured out plenty, but what is the whole truth? And how do you know when you’ve found it? Can it even be found?”

Photograph courtesy “Serial”

newyorker:

Sarah Larson talks with the creators of “Serial,” a spinoff of “This American Life” that is currently exploring a conviction with minimal evidence that put a teen-ager in prison for life: 

“Koenig wants to find the truth, whatever it is, more for human reasons than for legal ones. The team started producing “Serial” without knowing how it would end; in fact, they still don’t know. … They’ve figured out plenty, but what is the whole truth? And how do you know when you’ve found it? Can it even be found?”

Photograph courtesy “Serial”

parislemon:

This sure seems like classic cause/effect. Apple threatens to bull Bose products from stores, lawsuit between Bose and Apple-owned Beats magically dropped.
(Though there are alternative theories.)

parislemon:

This sure seems like classic cause/effect. Apple threatens to bull Bose products from stores, lawsuit between Bose and Apple-owned Beats magically dropped.

(Though there are alternative theories.)

thisistheverge:

HTC announces the Re Camera, an action camera for the rest of us

The Re Camera’s design is about as basic as it can get: it looks like a miniature periscope, upside-down asthma inhaler, or a pipe used to smoke various substances. It’s about as different from GoPro’s blocky designs as HTC could get, and depending on who you ask, it’s either cute and charming or just weird (I’m leaning towards weird).

thisistheverge:

HTC announces the Re Camera, an action camera for the rest of us

The Re Camera’s design is about as basic as it can get: it looks like a miniature periscope, upside-down asthma inhaler, or a pipe used to smoke various substances. It’s about as different from GoPro’s blocky designs as HTC could get, and depending on who you ask, it’s either cute and charming or just weird (I’m leaning towards weird).

Was Tinky Winky Gay?

priceonomics:

The purple Teletubbies star just wanted to frolic with his magical bag. Instead, he stirred a decade-long controversy that nearly destroyed the children’s program.

Read the Blog Post Here »

deviantart:

Eyes are difficult to draw. We rounded up a few tutorials and shared them in our Artist’s Toolbox!
Tutorial by ConceptCookie 

deviantart:

Eyes are difficult to draw. We rounded up a few tutorials and shared them in our Artist’s Toolbox!

Tutorial by ConceptCookie 

Your U-Spot and You

condomdepot:

shitontherocks:

spicy-gear:

Your U-Spot and You

uspotuniversity

By now, you’ve probably heard all about the G-Spot and A-Spot, both of which are highly sensitive areas located inside of the vaginal canal. But what about the lesser known, yet equally important, U-Spot?

Unlike the G and A-Spots, the U-Spot resides outside of the vagina and therefore does not require penetration in order to be stimulated. This makes this part of the vulva perfect for foreplay…

View On WordPress

Gonna read this laterrrr

griseldablondco:

spencerleegriffin:

When I met and shook hands with President Obama on Friday I introduced myself and said, “my name is Spencer Griffin and I work at collegehumor.com.” He said, “okay, so are you funny?” and I said confidently, “yeah, I’m funny.” And he said, “tell me something funny.” And I blanked. He laughed and said, “yeah, that’s what I thought.” I got roasted by the President of the United States.

BOY HE FLAMED YO ASS

griseldablondco:

spencerleegriffin:

When I met and shook hands with President Obama on Friday I introduced myself and said, “my name is Spencer Griffin and I work at collegehumor.com.” He said, “okay, so are you funny?” and I said confidently, “yeah, I’m funny.” And he said, “tell me something funny.” And I blanked. He laughed and said, “yeah, that’s what I thought.” I got roasted by the President of the United States.

BOY HE FLAMED YO ASS

“The basic idea is that commuters would be allowed to purchase a dollar amount of transit (say, $500 a month) and then use their phones or computers to order transit in the way they might a pizza.”