mucholderthen:

Posted on VisualLoop: 90 dataviz Tumblr blogs to followMarch 7, 2014 Read more …
Blogs on data visualization, cartography and data journalism in alphabetical order:
Afrographique
Anatomy Diagrams
Aron Pilhofer
Art & Science Journal
Baby Steps in Data Journalism
Beautiful Type
Beauty in Data
Brian McGill Newsart
Boston Globe Infographics department
CartoDB Blog
Cartophile
Charts n’ Things
Chicago Tribune Graphics
Cognitive Geometrics
Column Five
Dalalalataviz
Data Anxiety
Databurgh
Data, Dispatches, and Diagrams
Data Journalism Links
Data Journalism Tools
datahacker
Data Noveau
El Mundo Graficos
Explore
Fast Company on Tumblr
Feltron
Fuck ton of Anatomy References
Fuck Yeah Venn Diagrams
Geek Vizious
Geometry Matters
Graham Roberts
Hyperreal Cartography
How it works diagrams
I Love Charts
Inconsolata
Info Jocks
JESS3 on Tumblr
Judgmental Maps
Life and Code
Linda Hall Library
Maps Of the Continental United States (MOCUS).
Maps on the Web
Memuco
Mindfuck Maths
Moshita
Movies in Color
Movie Sound
Milwaukee Stat
National Post – Art & Design
Nature Graphics
New(s) Narratives
Old news graphics
Paul Bradshaw’s tumblelog
Pew Internet
Quantified Breakup
Quartz on Tumblr
Schema Design
Smithsonian Libraries
Statlas
Stephen Wildish
Tableau Love
Tiffany Farrant-Gonzalez work
Time for Maps
The 3-Minute Win
The annotation layer
The Appendix
The Art of Physics
The Atlantic Cities
The center for Investigative Reporting
The Economist
The Infogram Blog
The Land of Maps
The New Yorker on Tumblr
The Venn Review
Transit Maps
Thumbs Up Viz
Union Metrics
Vejo infográficos em tudo
Visualize
Visualizing Math
Visual knowledge
VizGif
VizForaCause
Vizzuality Blog
Washington Posts Information Graphics
We Love Datavis
WonkViz
Wolfram Alpha Blog
World Bank Data Viz
WTFViz

mucholderthen:

Posted on VisualLoop: 90 dataviz Tumblr blogs to follow
March 7, 2014 
Read more …

Blogs on data visualization, cartography and data journalism 
in alphabetical order:

theatlantic:

The ‘Next Silicon Valley’ Myth

The app economy is concentrating ever-more deeply in the Valley.
Read more. [Image: Wikimedia Commons]

theatlantic:

The ‘Next Silicon Valley’ Myth

The app economy is concentrating ever-more deeply in the Valley.

Read more. [Image: Wikimedia Commons]

theatlantic:

My Parents, the Real Mad Men

My father saw one episode of Mad Men and refused to watch any more. “You don’t make great ads by drinking and screwing all day!” was his angry objection to a show that he felt insulted the work he’d given his best years to.
As creative director at the Detroit ad agency Campbell-Ewald during precisely the same years that Mad Men portrays, my father, Thomas Murray, had poured his heart into making better advertising for what was the biggest client in the world, General Motors. 
And now some TV creeps were going to use all that as a stylish backdrop for a drama about decadence?
Over his dead body.
Since Dad died in 2009, I’ve been researching the contribution he and the other 1960s ad men made in the hopes of helping Mad Men fans learn what they missed by seeing that world through the filter of Don Draper’s preposterous drinking and casual sex. In a memoir I’m working on, I hope to commemorate the earnest, occasionally fierce, and almost moral devotion of 1960s advertising people to making more communicative, more candid, more human advertising for conservative corporate clients. 
Yes, but what about all the interoffice grab-ass? Was it really like that?
I’d say no, except I’m the product of it—but of a version that also contrasts significantly with the portrayal in Mad Men, and connects more coherently with how we live and work today.
Read more. [Image courtesy of David Murray]

theatlantic:

My Parents, the Real Mad Men

My father saw one episode of Mad Men and refused to watch any more. “You don’t make great ads by drinking and screwing all day!” was his angry objection to a show that he felt insulted the work he’d given his best years to.

As creative director at the Detroit ad agency Campbell-Ewald during precisely the same years that Mad Men portrays, my father, Thomas Murray, had poured his heart into making better advertising for what was the biggest client in the world, General Motors. 

And now some TV creeps were going to use all that as a stylish backdrop for a drama about decadence?

Over his dead body.

Since Dad died in 2009, I’ve been researching the contribution he and the other 1960s ad men made in the hopes of helping Mad Men fans learn what they missed by seeing that world through the filter of Don Draper’s preposterous drinking and casual sex. In a memoir I’m working on, I hope to commemorate the earnest, occasionally fierce, and almost moral devotion of 1960s advertising people to making more communicative, more candid, more human advertising for conservative corporate clients. 

Yes, but what about all the interoffice grab-ass? Was it really like that?

I’d say no, except I’m the product of it—but of a version that also contrasts significantly with the portrayal in Mad Men, and connects more coherently with how we live and work today.

Read more. [Image courtesy of David Murray]

compoundchem:

Version 1 of ‘A Rough Guide to Spotting Bad Science’. Thanks for everyone’s suggestions earlier in the week, attempted to include as many of them as possible!
Download link here: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-ap

compoundchem:

Version 1 of ‘A Rough Guide to Spotting Bad Science’. Thanks for everyone’s suggestions earlier in the week, attempted to include as many of them as possible!

Download link here: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-ap

Newsbeat app creates a radio show based on your favorite news sites

android-top-news:

New Post has been published on Android Top News

Newsbeat, a new app from Tribune Company, reads aloud news from over 7000 US publications, compiling them together into a short radio show to listen to on your daily commute.    

http://goo.gl/pFPpmL

#Apps, #NewsApps

lifemadesimple:

Healthy Food Replacements

A great idea to cut down on calories next time the urge to snack arrives.

Pending: Part two

(Source: handbymade)

theatlantic:

The Slaughter Bench of History

How war created civilization over the past 10,000 years—and threatens to destroy it in the next 40.
 Read more.[Image: Wikimedia Commons]

theatlantic:

The Slaughter Bench of History

How war created civilization over the past 10,000 years—and threatens to destroy it in the next 40.

 Read more.[Image: Wikimedia Commons]

theatlantic:

Everything You Need to Know About High-Frequency Trading

The stock market isn’t rigged, but it is taxed.
It always has been. As Justin Fox points out, for as long as people have been trading stocks, there have been middlemen taking a cut of the action. Now, that cut has gotten smaller as markets have gotten bigger and more technologically-advanced, but it’s still there. It’s the implicit fee that intermediaries charge for making sure there’s a buyer for every seller, and a seller for every buyer—for “making markets.”
But there’s a new kind of middleman today. They don’t work at stock exchanges or banks. They work at hedge funds, and trade at whiz-bang speeds. These “high-frequency traders” (HFT) use computer algorithms—a.k.a., algobots—to arbitrage away the most infinitesimal price discrepancies that only exist over the most infinitesimal time horizons. You can see just how small and how fast we’re talking about in the chart below from a new paper by Eric Budish and John Shim of the University of Chicago and Peter Cramton of the University of Maryland. It uses 2011 data to show the price difference between futures (blue) and exchange-traded funds (green) that both track the S&P 500. These should be perfectly correlated, and they are—at minute intervals. But this correlation disappears at 250 millisecond intervals, a little more than half the time it takes to blink your eyes. This is the “inefficiency” that HFT makes less so.
Read more. [Image: Reuters]

theatlantic:

Everything You Need to Know About High-Frequency Trading

The stock market isn’t rigged, but it is taxed.

It always has been. As Justin Fox points out, for as long as people have been trading stocks, there have been middlemen taking a cut of the action. Now, that cut has gotten smaller as markets have gotten bigger and more technologically-advanced, but it’s still there. It’s the implicit fee that intermediaries charge for making sure there’s a buyer for every seller, and a seller for every buyer—for “making markets.”

But there’s a new kind of middleman today. They don’t work at stock exchanges or banks. They work at hedge funds, and trade at whiz-bang speeds. These “high-frequency traders” (HFT) use computer algorithms—a.k.a., algobots—to arbitrage away the most infinitesimal price discrepancies that only exist over the most infinitesimal time horizons. You can see just how small and how fast we’re talking about in the chart below from a new paper by Eric Budish and John Shim of the University of Chicago and Peter Cramton of the University of Maryland. It uses 2011 data to show the price difference between futures (blue) and exchange-traded funds (green) that both track the S&P 500. These should be perfectly correlated, and they are—at minute intervals. But this correlation disappears at 250 millisecond intervals, a little more than half the time it takes to blink your eyes. This is the “inefficiency” that HFT makes less so.

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

(Source: voyagehour)